Genetic progress TN70: stronger sows, more piglets and better finishers

The latest genetic progress achieved in the Norsvin Landrace and Z-line populations at Topigs Norsvin’s nucleus farms is impressive. These two lines are the basis for the TN70 sow. And at the customer level, about the same genetic improvement in the TN70 sow can be expected in the next 5 years.

This improvement is thanks to progress in many traits and is a super example of Topigs Norsvin’s balanced breeding approach.

>> 1 piglet more weaned per litter
In the last 5 years, the genetic trend on the nucleus level for born alive improved by 0.75 piglet per litter. This did not lead to higher stillborn or higher weaning mortality. On the contrary, the number of stillborn per litter decreased by 0.2 and preweaning mortality decreased by 2.8%. Birthweight and litter uniformity were not negatively influenced either.

All of this adds up to a genetic trend of 1 more piglet weaned per litter in 5 years. This is higher than the genetic trend for born alive.

>> Increased sow longevity
Together with the higher production, the sow’s longevity has improved too. The future TN70 will be even stronger still and produce more litters. Sow fertility will also improve as the prolonged interval between weaning and insemination will be reduced.

>> 75 gram higher daily gain and increased carcass quality
In the last 5 years, genetic improvement of the lines has led to a higher finisher gain of 75 grams per day. Carcass quality also improved during this period.

>> 16 kilos less feed in finisher phase
Substantial genetic progress is achieved in the finisher phase too. In the last 5 years, genetic progress at the nucleus level has reduced the feed needed in the finisher phase by about 16 kg per pig. This reduction is based on a crossbred of TN Tempo x TN70 and will gradually reach customers’ barns in the next 5 years. This improved feed efficiency means not just lower production costs but less environmental impact too.

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